Rembrandt Laughing
(5000-2030)

Intently interested in the expression of human emotion, Rembrandt often used himself as his own model in his early years as an independent master in Leiden. Here, in a small and freely painted work, he appears in the guise of a soldier, relaxed and engaging the viewer with a laugh. For this sophisticated self-portrait, painted at age twenty-one or twenty-two, Rembrandt combines a study of character and emotion (known in Dutch as a tronie) with a rare jovial self-presentation. The lively, short brushwork in the face and brisk handling of the neutral background convey a sense of spontaneity and immediacy. This is one of a small number of paintings by Rembrandt from the late 1620s executed on copper. He signed it in the upper-left corner with his monogram of interlocking letters, "RHL" (Rembrandt Harmenszoon Leidensis), which he used only briefly, from late 1627 to early 1629.Art + Ideas Podcast: Anne Woollett on Rembrandt Laughing

Oil on copper (about 1628)

by Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669)


Art-Print Options

18"x24" (46cm x 61cm) Paper $59.99
24"x36" (61cm x 92cm) Paper $99.99
32"x44" (81cm x 112cm) Paper $149.99
44"x60" (112cm x153cm) Paper $269.99

Framed print with double mat
18"x24" (46cm x 61cm) Paper $239.99 See framed
24"x36" (61cm x 92cm) Paper $304.99 See framed

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See this image as:

wall mural